Fieldnotes: Digital Resources

A permanent list of digital resources in archaeology and related fields.

See also: Directory of Graduate Programs in the United States and Canada

The course has a strong practical element and is particularly suitable for students with a liberal arts, humanities or social science background who need basic business and management skills.  
The Curriculum in Archaeology brings together archaeology faculty located in five units of the College of Arts and Sciences. These units are the Departments of Anthropology, Art, Classics, Religious Studies, the Research Laboratories of Archaeology. The Curriculum offers an undergraduate major and a minor in archaeology. It also offers courses and research opportunities for students in many parts of the world, particularly in the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East. Laboratories, computer facilities, and extensive research collections are maintained by the Research Laboratories of Archaeology. Additional archaeological collections are housed in the Department of Classics and Ackland Art Museum.
The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is an international digital archive and repository that houses data about archaeological investigations, research, resources, and scholarship. tDAR provides researchers new avenues to discover and integrate information relevant to topics they are studying. Users can search tDAR for digital documents, data sets, images, GIS files, and other data resources from archaeological projects spanning the globe.
The Gabii Project was launched in 2007 with the objective of studying and excavating the ancient Latin city of Gabii, a city-state that was both a neighbor of, and a rival to, Rome in the first millennium BC.
The Gabii Project is an international archaeological initiative under the direction of Nicola Terrenato of the University of Michigan. It was launched in 2007 with the objective of studying and excavating the ancient Latin city of Gabii, a city-state that was both a neighbor of, and a rival to, Rome in the first millennium BC. Located in the region of Italy once known as Latium, the site of Gabii was occupied since at least the tenth century BC until its decline in the second and third centuries AD. Amazingly, in subsequent centuries the site of Gabii was never developed or even substantially occupied, nor has the urban area ever been the site of major, stratigraphic excavations. As such, the site provides a unique opportunity to study the development and structure of Archaic urban planning in Central Italy, both monumental and civic architecture, domestic space, and all other corollary studies. Since Gabii eventually became a part of the Roman Empire – first as a member of the Latin League and later as a town with municipal status - numerous important intersections exist between Gabii and Rome.
The Graduate Group in the Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World trains students for careers in the art and archaeology of Classical and Near Eastern Civilizations. Drawing on the vast resources of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, AAMW incorporates fieldwork, museum internships, and university instruction into a flexible interdisciplinary program leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. All students accepted into the program are fully funded for a period of at least five years.
The interdepartmental Council on Archaeological Studies is composed of faculty from a broad range of disciplines, including Anthropology, Classics, Geology and Geophysics, and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. Undergraduate and graduate programs are offered, the former awarding a BA and the latter an MA. Both programs are designed to expose students to numerous facets of the field of archaeology, including anthopology, art history, and history; studies often examine the material culture or transformation of various cultures in both the Old and New Worlds. Students in each program are, additionally, required to take an Archaeology Laboratory course which provides hands-on excavation experience at the Dye Works at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
The Johns Hopkins Undergraduate Program in Archaeology is an interdepartmental program that introduces students to archaeological theory, the analysis of archaeological materials, and the results of archaeological research in prehistoric and early historic periods in the Old and New Worlds. Archaeology studies human societies through examination of their material culture (physical remains), considering such issues as human subsistence, interaction with climate and physical environment, patterns of settlement, political and economic organization, and religious activity and thought. The field allows for the study of the entirety of human experience from its beginnings to the present day, in every region of the world and across all social strata.
 The Kenchreai Cemetery Project (2002-2006) was an interdisciplinary study of burial grounds at the eastern port of Corinth during the Roman Empire. This website summarizes the findings of the Kenchreai Cemetery Project. 
Mitrou is a tidal islet in the bay of Atalanti in East Lokris, Greece. For most, if not all, of the Bronze Age, Mitrou was the largest and most important settlement of East Lokris, and it is in an excellent state of preservation.