Fieldnotes: Digital Resources

A permanent list of digital resources in archaeology and related fields.

See also: Directory of Graduate Programs in the United States and Canada

The Gabii Project was launched in 2007 with the objective of studying and excavating the ancient Latin city of Gabii, a city-state that was both a neighbor of, and a rival to, Rome in the first millennium BC.
The Gabii Project is an international archaeological initiative under the direction of Nicola Terrenato of the University of Michigan. It was launched in 2007 with the objective of studying and excavating the ancient Latin city of Gabii, a city-state that was both a neighbor of, and a rival to, Rome in the first millennium BC. Located in the region of Italy once known as Latium, the site of Gabii was occupied since at least the tenth century BC until its decline in the second and third centuries AD. Amazingly, in subsequent centuries the site of Gabii was never developed or even substantially occupied, nor has the urban area ever been the site of major, stratigraphic excavations. As such, the site provides a unique opportunity to study the development and structure of Archaic urban planning in Central Italy, both monumental and civic architecture, domestic space, and all other corollary studies. Since Gabii eventually became a part of the Roman Empire – first as a member of the Latin League and later as a town with municipal status - numerous important intersections exist between Gabii and Rome.
 The Kenchreai Cemetery Project (2002-2006) was an interdisciplinary study of burial grounds at the eastern port of Corinth during the Roman Empire. This website summarizes the findings of the Kenchreai Cemetery Project. 
Mitrou is a tidal islet in the bay of Atalanti in East Lokris, Greece. For most, if not all, of the Bronze Age, Mitrou was the largest and most important settlement of East Lokris, and it is in an excellent state of preservation.
The Nemea Valley Archaeological Project (NVAP) is sponsored by Bryn Mawr College and conducted fieldwork under the auspices of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens with permissions from the Ministry of Culture and Sciences of Greece.
The Pylos Regional Archaeological Project (PRAP) is a multi-disciplinary, diachronic archaeological expedition formally organized in 1990 to investigate the history of prehistoric and historic settlement and land use in western Messenia in Greece, in an area centered on the Bronze Age administrative center known as the Palace of Nestor.
The Sikyon survey project (University of Thessaly in collaboration with the 37th Ephoreia of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities) is a fully integrated multidisciplinary research program to study the human presence and activity on the plateau of ancient Sikyon, a city in northeastern Peloponnese between Corinth and Achaia.
The Sphakia Survey is an interdisciplinary archaeological project whose main objective is to reconstruct the sequence of human activity in a remote and rugged part of Crete (Greece), from the time that people arrived in the area, by ca 3000 BC, until the end of Ottoman rule in AD 1900.
The Nemea Center for Classical Archaeology, a research unit within the Department of Classics, founded in 2004, promotes teaching, research, and public service centered on the University of California excavations at Nemea, Greece and its surrounding region.