New Course 2015: Conservation in Archaeology & Biological Anthropology focused on the Dig of the Roman City of Sanisera


Location: Es Mercadal, Spain

Season: 
Thursday, April 9, 2015 to Thursday, November 12, 2015

Session dates: 
1) April 9 - April 28; 2) May 01 - May 20; 3) May 23 - June 11; 4) June 14 - July 03; 5) July 06 - July 25; 6) July 28 - August 16; 7) August 19 - September 07; 8) September 10 - September 29; 9) October 02 - October 21; 10) October 24 - November 12

Flyer: 034.pdf

Program Type

Field school

Affiliation:

The Sanisera Archaeology Institute for International Field Schools offers over 20 international courses focusing on archaeology, anthropology, GIS, underwater archaeology, conservation, art, museums and archaeological film. Student's fieldwork centers on the survey and excavation of classical sites. - See more at: http://archaeology.institute

Project Director:

Valeria dall'Ara & Fernando Contreras

Project Description

Sanisera Archaeology Institute for International Field Schools

http://archaeology.institute/sanisera-archaeology-institute.asp

Our commitment is to promote Archaeology in its different aspects of research, training, and conservation, with a basic and clear purpose: to involve anyone from around the world who wishes to gain access to this scientific field. Sanisera is an international archaeological organization whose main aim is that of promoting and developing research , so that our current and future generations can be enriched by culture and education in this field.

We are not only in Spain, but we also have courses in Greece, Portugal, France, UK, Croatia, Turkey and Italy. We offer students more than 20 courses that can enrich their CVs, validate university credits and get recommendation letters to enter the job market or get into prestigious scientific research centers.

Our work is focused on the archaeological study of ancient cities, anthropology, osteology, digging graves, conservation in archaeology, art, museums, excavate shipwrecks and submerged cities of ancient ports in the underwater school in archaeology, how to make a movie, learning GIS Software for archaeologists and discovering the most important monuments from Ancient civilizations such as Athens and Rome.

Why participate?

http://archaeology.institute/sanisera-archaeology-institute-why-participate.asp

General Information

http://archaeology.institute/034-conservation-in-archaeology-on-the-dig-of-sanisera.asp

In 2008 the Sanisera Archaeology Institute for International Field Schools started its courses at the Roman city of Sanisera. During all these years many students have come from all over the world to study abroad to Menorca (Balearic Islands, Spain) in order to dig up the Roman remains located at this classical site on the Northern coast of the island.

The research is focused on the archaeological excavation of Sanisera and studies what happened in this Roman port connected to the maritime traffic that sailed the Mediterranean during those times. As a result, we know that this is a very interesting archaeological site, with abundant findings of multiple artifacts that will help us to reconstruct its past.

The excavation at the Roman city of Sanisera provides all the archaeological documentation necessary for the student to acquire enough training and experience in all aspects involving an excavation dating from the Roman period, between the 2nd century BC and the 6th century AD.

In addition to this, we have excavated 90 tombs so far, which belong to a Roman cemetery that could have been related to a basilica in the Roman city if Sanisera, which dates from the 4th and 6th centuries AD. The Osteology corpus in this necropolis includes more than 232 individuals.

Conservation is an integral part of the archaeological process and the post-excavation study of archaeological finds. During the excavation you will find urban structures, Roman graves and archaeological remains from the Classical period including Roman pottery, amphorae, glass, human bones, faunal remains, coins, metals –bronze, iron, silver-, ivory, etc. All these artifacts have to be treated in a particular way depending on the material they were made of, by applying a set of techniques and methods to preserve and protect them in perfect conditions against deterioration.

Once fieldwork is finished, those archaeological structures belonging to buildings and tombs remain out in the open and exposed to both human and natural agents of all types. Fieldwork in conservation will apply a program and a set of practices to the preservation and consolidation of archaeological remains located in the Roma city of Sanisera.

Also all archaeological materials found at Sanisera will be treated properly at the laboratory, where we will clean, inventory and classify them. When necessary, materials will be restored before packing them properly in boxes that will be sent to safe storage areas in the museum.

What you will learn

In the Fieldwork

  • First aid for finds. How to dig up significant finds properly.  
  • Excavation, cleaning and consolidation of wall frescos or stuccos that could have paintings on them.  
  • Conservation and consolidation of opus signinum pavements.
  • Consolidation of Roman cisterns lined by opus signinum, which were used in the storage of liquids.
  • Reconstruction of archaeological structures with fallen stones.  
  • Reconstruction of the original height of some structures.  
  • Applying methods to avoid the collapse of the ground or the growth of vegetation that can degrade structures and tombs.  
  • Reinforce some structures by applying modern consolidating materials.
  • Recording the data obtained during the consolidating process in each artifact that has been treated.

In the Laboratory

  • Treatment of significant finds made out of pottery, glass, bone and metal – such as Roman coins, nails and keys.
  • Conservation of objects found on site which still have two thirds of their original volume.
  • Proper treatment in the cleaning of human crania found in the tombs.
  • Proper methods in the packing of finds for their storage.

Theory

  • Archaeological objects before and after they are found.
  • Underground and external agents that affect materials.
  • Materials to Use and to Avoid.
  • Field Techniques for specific artifacts: bones, metal, ceramics, special cases.
  • Laboratory curation considerations.
  • Basic rules for proper packing of archaeological materials.
  • Preventive conservation strategies and practices for archaeological museums and sites collections.

Directed at

The training provided in this course and the experience you can acquire can be of importance in your future if you are thinking about archaeology, conservation or curation in a professional level.

You can learn from the beginning conservation techniques and methodology. During this course you will have the chance to practice with archaeological remains dating from the Classical period, including Roman pottery, amphorae, glass, human bones, faunal remains, coins, metals, ivory, etc. You will learn how to treat them properly at the laboratory.

The comprehensive experience that you will gain in this course will help you to decide if you want to pursue archaeology, conservation, or curation as a profession.  

Previous knowledge or experience in archaeology or computer systems is not required.

Field School life & language

The fieldwork focuses on the conservation of Classical archaeological remains and artifacts dating from the Roman period.

It runs 7 hours a day and is divided between fieldwork conservation, lab work with archaeological remains, exercises, lectures and excursions.

Participants will visit other archaeological sites on the island through organized excursions. For every seven course days, there are two days off. The course is taught in English and Spanish.

Certificates

At the end of the Field Program, students will receive a certificate of participation stating the hours and activities of the course. Participants that perform exceedingly well in the course may receive a letter of recommendation from our organization upon request.

Sessions & Cost

In 2015, 10 sessions, 20 days each
Session #1 April 9 – April 28 $ 1,600
Session #2 May 01 – May 20 $ 1,600
Session #3 May 23 - June 11 $ 2,100
Session #4 June 14 – July 03 $ 2,300
Session #5 July 06 – July 25 $ 2,300
Session #6 July 28 - August 16 $ 2,300
Session #7 August 19 – September 07  $ 1,800
Session #8 September 10 - September 29 $ 1,500
Session #9 October 02 - October 21 $ 1,300
Session #10 October 24 – November 12 $ 1,300

Spaces available

The course is limited to 8 participants per session. Reservations are only effective when payment of the registration fee is received. If for any reason the course is cancelled, payment is returned according to the field school refund policy.

Period(s) of Occupation: Roman (Classical Archaeology)

Project size: 
1-24 participants

Minimum Length of Stay for Volunteers: 20 days

Minimum age: 
18 (contact with questions about age)

Experience required: 
No

Room and Board Arrangements

Course fee includes

  • Course tuition
  • Accomodation
  • Daily transportation to/from the archaeological fieldwork.
  • Transportation while in Spain
  • Breakfast, lunch and dinner
  • Accident insurance.
  • Excursions.
  • Certificate of participation

Airfare not included from the student home to/from Menorca (Spain)

Cost: 
From $1300 to $2300 (session)

Academic Credit

Name of institution offering credit: 
Please, contact Cesar Gonzalez, our course coordinator, in order to get more information about this possibility sanisera@arrakis.es
Number of credits offered: none

Location

Contact Information
Cesar Gonzalez
APDO 68
Es Mercadal
Menorca
Spain
07740
Telephone: 
+1 347 8710963

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