The AIA Publication Subvention Program

Archaeological Institute of America

Deadline: November 1, 2014
Deadline: March 1, 2015

The Archaeological Institute of America invites applications for its Publications Subventions. The deadlines for completed applications are March 1 and  November 1.

The Archaeological Institute of America launched the Publications Subvention Program in 2005. This program offers subventions from the AIA’s von Bothmer Publication Fund in support of new book-length publications in the field of Classical Archaeology (defined as Greek, Roman, and Etruscan archaeology and art history). Particularly welcome are projects that publish the work of first-time authors or represent the publication of final reports of primary data from sites already excavated or surveyed, but are still unpublished.

The program is administered by the Publications Subvention Committee, which meets periodically to select publications for support. The deadlines for completed applications are March 1 and  November 1. Grants average $5,000, though smaller or larger amounts may be awarded at the discretion of the Committee. The Committee is comprised of AIA members with scholarly expertise in the areas designated for the Grant.

Nominations should be submitted by eligible nonprofit publishers, such as university or museum presses, to the AIA Publications Subvention Committee, who will review submissions and grant the subventions. All manuscripts submitted for consideration must conform to AIA’s policies regarding the initial publication of undocumented antiquities. All authors of manuscripts must be members of the Archaeological Institute of America, though grants are open to scholars and nonprofit publishers of all nations. These subventions are not intended to support the publication of previously published works (including collections of previously published essays) or congress proceedings.

The selected manuscripts will acknowledge the subvention with the following statement on the copyright page or on the reverse of the title page: "Publication of this book has been aided by a grant from the von Bothmer Publication Fund of the Archaeological Institute of America." Below this statement must appear the logotype of the AIA (camera-ready or digital copy to be supplied by the Archaeological Institute of America). The subvention should also be acknowledged with this or a similar statement in announcements or publicity about the publication of the book, as well as in all advertisements insofar as possible.

Application Process

All applications must be made entirely online. The deadlines for submission of all completed forms are March 1 and November 1. Submissions made via regular mail, fax, or other means will not be accepted. There are four parts to the applications including a portion to be completed by the publisher. Please review the Guidelines and Required Information pages prior to completing the forms.

Guidelines for Submission

Checklist for Applicants

Online Grant Application Forms

  • Form I (to be completed by Primary Author)
  • Form II (to be completed by Publisher)

Contact

If you have questions or require further information please contact:

AIA Publications Subvention Committee
Archaeological Institute of America
656 Beacon Street, 6th floor
Boston, MA 02215-9361
fellowships@aia.bu.edu

For more information, please contact the Fellowship Coordinator.

For information about supporting the AIA Publications Subvention Program, please contact Jennifer Klahn.

Contact:
AIA Fellowship Coordinator
fellowships@aia.bu.edu
617-358-4184

Recipients

Current Recipients

Architecture and Politics in Republican Rome, by Penelope J. E. DaviesArchitecture and Politics in Republican Rome, by Penelope J. E. Davies of the University of Texas at Austin, published by Cambridge University Press. In this work, Dr. Davies examines the architectural evolution occurring in Rome during the Republic, arguing that the Republic’s government and its buildings were inextricably intertwined. The volume challenges previous beliefs that little evidence of early Roman architecture still exists, and by combining evidence from little known excavations, Davies provides substantial accounts for building trends in all phases of the city’s development. The $5,000 subvention will be used towards the volume’s illustrations, which include photographs, maps, plans, and reconstructions.

Architecture, Ceremony and the Afterlife of the Roman City, AD 250 – 850, by Hendrik W. DeyArchitecture, Ceremony and the Afterlife of the Roman City, AD 250 – 850, by Hendrik W. Dey of Hunter College, published by Cambridge University Press.  In this work Dr. Dey examines the network of cities that spanned the Roman Empire, and their development in late antiquity.  Using material evidence from several key sites (Rome, Milan, Ravenna, and Constantinople), he argues that these urban centers not only survived in the post-classic period, but continues to thrive and function as they did during the Empire.  The $3,000 Subvention will be used towards the production of halftone illustrations and color plates for the volume.

Treading the grapes in the cella vinaria (reconstruction Dirk Booms and Elizabeth Fentress)Treading the grapes in the cella vinaria (reconstruction Dirk Booms and Elizabeth Fentress)

Villa Magna: an Imperial Estate and its Legacies. Excavations 2006 – 2010, by Elizabeth Fentress et alia, and published by The British School at Rome as part of its monograph series. This work provides interpretation of primary data from the excavations of the Villa Magna at the foot of Monte Lepini, from its inception under Hadrian, and the monastery, village and castrum that developed on the site in the Middle Ages.  The publication will be of importance to scholars of Roman and Medieval Italy, expanding knowledge of imperial behavior and of the region in general.  The Subvention of $5,930 will be used towards general production costs and color illustrations, an accompanying website, and towards keeping down the sale price of the volume.

Pompeii, House of Sallust, Atrium, restored view from the northwestPompeii, House of Sallust, Atrium, restored view from the northwest (Creator John Burge, copyright Anne Laidlaw & Journal of Roman Archaeology LLC)

The House of Sallust in Pompeii, VI 2, 4, by Anne Laidlaw et alia, published by the Journal of Roman Archaeology. The volume is the first substantial publication of the House of Sallust in Pompeii and provides the primary documentation for the work at the site. Earliest excavations of the house occurred between 1763 and 1809 and this book analyzes all of the accumulated evidence in order to make clear what can be said about building phases and dating. The $4,309 Publication Subvention will be used towards extensive color illustrations, color photomosaics of the house façade and a cross-section of the atrium, and large folding plans of the house.

 

Graffito of human figure carved inside a burial bed in catacomb 1 of the Beit Shearim necropolis, Israel. Photo: Ezra GabbayGraffito of human figure carved inside a burial bed in catacomb 1 of the Beit Shearim necropolis, Israel. Photo: Ezra Gabbay

Writing on the Wall: Graffiti and the Forgotten Jews of Late Antiquity, by Karen B. Stern of Brooklyn College (CUNY), published by Princeton University Press. The volume examines graffiti produced by Jews in antiquity, and is the first full-length treatment of the material.  Hundreds of examples have been found in burial caves, around pagan temples and inside synagogues, in theatres, and in markets throughout the Mediterranean world, helping to illuminate features of daily life otherwise unattested in literary, epigraphic, and archaeological sources.  The $2,500 Subvention will be used towards illustration preparation, fees for map preparation, and permission costs.

AIA web image Touna el-Gebel, Tomb of Petosiris, author image VENITAIA web image Touna el-Gebel, Tomb of Petosiris, author image VENIT

Imaging the Afterlife:  Negotiating Death in Graeco-Roman Egypt, by Marjorie Venit of the University of Maryland, published by Cambridge University Press.  Dr. Venit examines the culture of death and commemoration of the dead that evolved after Egypt came under Greek rule in the late fourth century BC, focusing in particular on a series of decorated monumental tombs that were created from c. 300 BC to 250 AD.  Her analysis shows concrete evidence for the interchange of ideas about death and the afterlife among the two major population groups of Graeco-Roman Egypt, as well as a unique perspective on the problems posed by cultural identification, assimilation, and differentiation between the two cultures.  The $5,000 Subvention will be used towards the extensive illustrations (188 black & white illustrations and 8 color plates).

Past Recipients

The Sanctuary of Demeter at Eleusis: The Bronze Age by Michael B. Cosmopoulos of the University of Missouri at St. Louis, and published by the Athens Archaeological Society.  The volume constitutes the complete and final publication of the extensive Bronze Age finds from past excavations, allowing the Sanctuary and materials to be viewed as a unified whole for the first time, and shedding new light on the early life and development of this important site and of the Eleusinian cult.  The volume has been awarded a $3,500 Subvention, and is also receiving a $3,000 Samuel H. Kress Grant for Research and Publication in Classical Art and Architecture; the funds will be used towards the costs of printing and bookbinding.

Shaping Ceremony: Monumental Steps and Greek Architecture, by Mary B. Hollinshead of the University of Rhode Island, and published by the University of Wisconsin Press.  The volume is part of the Wisconsin Studies in Classics series, and employs an innovative methodology that combines architectural theory and biomechanical insights to examine monumental steps in Greek architecture.  Such steps have long been associated with autocratic and imperial power, but the author argues that they were instead most likely used for processions and assemblies that involved Greeks of varying status at festivals and similar gatherings.  The $5,000 Subvention will be used for the commissioning of 20 plans for the volume, and for permission fees for image use.

The Roman Aqaba Project Final Report, Volume 1: The Regional Environment and the Regional Survey, by S. Thomas Parker of North Carolina State University, and published by the American Schools of Oriental Research as part of their Archaeological Report Series.  The volume will present primary data from Aila at Aqaba, a major trade hub of the Roman Empire with the Red Sea regions and beyond, and a port which flourished from Nabatean times through Roman, and into the early Islamic period.  The report will offer a valuable resource for scholars of Roman studies and economic historians, with implications for efforts in heritage management. The $5,000 Subvention will be used for various production costs, including typesetting and printing.

Egypt in Italy: Visions of Egypt in Roman Imperial Culture by Maria Swetnam-Burland of the College of William & Mary, and published by the Cambridge University Press.  In this volume the author examines the role of Egyptian art in Roman politics, religion, and visual culture in the period after Rome’s conquest of Egypt in 30 B.C.; in particular she focuses on the significance and appeal that Egyptian objects and artwork held for Roman viewers, what they reveal about Roman ideas of imperialism and geographical expansion of empire, and what the Roman taste for Egyptian objects tells us about what they knew (or thought they knew) about Egyptian history.  The $3,500 award will be used to commission an archaeological illustrator to create new line drawings, maps, and plans, illustrating aspects of key buildings in the study, and showing them in a new light.

Samothrace: The Monuments of the Eastern Hill (Samothrace Vol. 9) by Bonna D. Wescoat of Emory University, et. al., and published by the American School of Classical Studies in Athens as part of their series Samothrace, excavations conducted by the Institute of Fine Arts of New York University.  In this substantial volume the key monuments that form the Sanctuary of the Great Gods’ theater complex, including the theater circle, the fieldstone building, the marble Doric hexastyle dedication of Philip III and Alexander IV, the later Ionic porch, and the remains of dozens of bronze statues that originally framed the circle, are presented in the archaeological, architectural, and historical contexts.  The Subvention of $7,500 will be used towards the cost of publishing the plates in a separate volume from the text.

Heroic Offerings: The Terracotta Plaques from the Sanctuary of Alexandra/Kassandra and Agamemnon at Amyklai, by Gina Salapata and published by the University of Michigan Press.  The volume will present Professor Salapata’s detailed analysis of the terracotta plaques deposited at the Sanctuary of Amyklai, and place them in their relation to stone reliefs from other sites in Lakonia.  Much of the Lakonian votive material that is examined has not been published before.  The $2,500 subvention will be used for direct publication costs.

Corinth XXI, A Slice through Time: Tombs along the North Terrace at Corinth, by Kathleen Warner Slane (additional contributors are Ethne Barnes, David S. Reese, and David R. Jordan), published by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens as volume XXI of the ASCSA’s own Corinth monograph series. The volume will present materials found during rescue excavations in the early 1960s, including tile graves, limestone sarcophagi, cremation burials, and chamber tombs; the purpose of the work is to publish the excavations and to examine the evidence of changing burial practices at the site other time (5th century B.C. to 6th century A.D.), from Greek city to Roman colony, and as its population became Christian. The $5,000 subvention will be used to produce the volume at the same quality of the rest of the Corinth series.

Couched in Death: Klinai and Identity in Anatolia and Beyond by Elizabeth Baughan, published by the University of Wisconsin Press as part of the Wisconsin Studies in Classics series, is the recipient of the 2012 Publication Subvention.  Professor Baughan’s volume is a study of ancient furniture, specifically the klinai (couches) found in Anatolian tombs, and is the first comprehensive study of funeral beds and couches  in 6th and 5th century Asia Minor with analysis of their social and cultural significance.  The $2,500 subvention will be used for image reproduction fees.

Leptiminus (Lamta): a Roman Port Town in Tunusia. Report no. 3: The Field Survey by David L. Stone, David J. Mattingly, and Nejib ben Lazreg (eds.) is the recipient of a 2011 AIA Publication Subvention Grant.  The volume is being published by the Journal of Roman Archaeology, as part of their Supplemental Series.  The third of the Leptiminus fieldwork reports, this volume will cover work done from 1990 to 1999, spanning Neolithic to medieval and modern periods, with particular emphasis on the thriving 2ndto 3rdcentury A.D. town.  The $6,190 subvention will be used to cover the costs of accompanying CDs (containing gazetteers of the sites in the Urban and Rural Surveys), and color images in the volume.

Shelley Wachsmann is the recipient of a 2011 AIA Publication Subvention for his volume on The Gurob Ship-Cart Model and its Mediterranean Context, published by the Texas A&M University Press.  The Gurob model represents a remarkable Bronze Age Greek galley, for which a full-scale example is yet unknown.  Professor Wachsmann’s work seeks to place the ship type in context, including what it reveals about the identity and culture of the Sea Peoples, the religious practices of ancient Egypt and Greece, and the kinds of vessels that Bronze Age Greece used to extend trade and influence throughout the Mediterranean world.  The $7,500 subvention will be used towards direct publication costs for the volume.

Joseph L. Rife is a 2010 recipient of the Publication Subvention Grant, for his Isthmia IX: The Roman and Byzantine Graves and Human Remains.  The volume is the ninth volume in the American School of Classical Studies at Athens’ series on Isthmia, one of the four great Panhellenic sanctuaries.  The book is a detailed study of the finds from this key site, integrating funerary evidence and skeletal biology to shed needed light on a period of transition for both urban and rural communities in the northeastern Peloponnese.  Professor Rife is with the Department of Classical Studies at Vanderbilt University, and this is his first published book.  The $5,000 subvention will be used to help produce this 600-page monograph at the same quality as the other volumes in the series.

Heather JacksonThe 2009 recipient of the AIA's Publication Subvention is Heather Jackson for Jebel Khalid on the Euphrates, Volume III: The Pottery, which she is co-authoring with John Tidmarsh. Dr. Jackson is an Honorary Fellow with University of Melbourne, and has authored other forthcoming volumes in the series including the reports on terracotta figurines and on the housing insula. A Hellenistic site on the west bank of the Euphrates in Northern Syria, the Jebel Khalid was excavated from 1985 through 2005 in a joint effort by the Australian National University and the University of Melbourne. This volume (published as a supplemental volume to Mediterranean Archaeology) will be the third report from the excavations, and the Subvention will defray the costs of the illustrations, copy editing and printing.

The recipient of the 2008 Publications Subvention Grant is Matthew Canepa for his volume The Two Eyes of the Earth: Competition and Exchange in the Art and Ritual of Kingship between Rome and Sansanian Iran, published by the University of California Press. Professor Canepa is with the College of Charleston, Department of Art History, Programs in Archaeology and Asian Studies. A specialist in the art and cultures of the late Roman Empire and Pre-Islamic Iran, Professor Canepa’s research focuses on cross-cultural interaction in the ancient world. His new volume will be the first to analyze the artistic, ritual and ideological interactions between the Roman and Sasanian empires in a comprehensive and theoretically rigorous manner.