Before Lake Powell: Memories of Glen Canyon Archaeology

Sponsored by Spokane Society

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, May 1, 2013 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W. 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99204
United States

Dr. William Lipe, Professor Emeritus, Washington State University

When the Glen Canyon Dam was completed in 1963, Lake Powell started to fill, eventually extending over 180 miles up the Colorado River from the dam site. From 1958 through 1961, archaeologist Bill Lipe led crews studying some of the archaeological sites destined to be destroyed by the lake and its visitors. In this talk, he will draw on his recollections, as wel as on 50-year-old photos and films, to discuss how the archaeological work was done and what was learned before the sites were permanently affected by the development of Lake Powell. He will also touch briefly on the role that the controversy over damming Glen Canyon played in the development of the environmental and historic preservation movements of the 1960s and 1970s.

Contact:
Catharine Roth
CRoth@scc.spokane.edu
509-533-7474

Ancient Tel Dor in Israel

Sponsored by Spokane Society

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W. 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99204
United States

Dr. Sarah Stroup, Associate Professor, University of Washington

Ancient Dor, a bustling and multi-cultural port town located on the northern coast of Israel, was inhabited for well over 1000 years, from the days of King Solomon to the reign of the Roman Emperor Alexander Severus. The first part of the talk provides a survey of Dor from the 6th century BCE to the 2nd century CE, based on excavations in the past eleven years. The second part of the talk addresses three aspects of the site that inform our understanding of interaction between the inhabitants of the city and the western Greeks with whom they came into contact: a large murex dye complex, a key source of luxury goods; a large fragment of fine mosaic depicting a Hellenistic theatrical mask; and a small carefully-crafted carnelian intaglio depicting Alexander the Great, who traveled through Dor in 332 BCE.

Contact:
Catharine Roth
CRoth@scc.spokane.edu
509-533-7474

The Mosaics of Zeugma on the Euphrates: visual culture on the Roman frontier

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 - 6:30pm

Location:
Museum of Arts & Culture in Spokane
Spokane, WA
United States

Lecturer: Katherine Dunbabin

Abstract: The Mosaics of Zeugma on the Euphrates: visual culture on the Roman frontier

Norton Lecture

Contact:
Bonny Bazemore
gbazemore@ewu.edu

From Dunhuang (P.R. China): the oldest Star Atlas

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, February 6, 2013 - 6:30pm

Location:
Museum of Arts & Culture in Spokane
Spokane, WA
United States

Lecturer: Nicholas David

Abstract: From Dunhuang (P.R. China): the oldest Star Atlas

Contact:
Bonny Bazemore
gbazemore@ewu.edu

Death and Sacrifice at Midnight Terror Cave

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, October 3, 2012 - 6:30pm

Location:
Museum of Arts & Culture in Spokane
Spokane, WA
United States

Lecturer: James Brady

Abstract: Death and Sacrifice at Midnight Terror Cave

Stone Lecture

Contact:
Bonny Bazemore
gbazemore@ewu.edu

“The Curious Case of the Octagonal Gemstones: A Possible New Pagan and Early Christian Workshop in Turkey”

Sponsored by Spokane Society

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W. 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99204
United States

Dr. Andrew Goldman (Gonzaga University)

Octagonal intaglios represent a curious, relatively rare gemstone category within museum and private collections.  Dating to late Roman imperial period (2nd-4th centuries AD), they bear a wide range of conventional pagan and early Christian symbols and inscriptions.  These eight-sized gems have received little scholarly attention, however, and their exact provenance has remained elusive.  During the 1950s, excavation at Gordion in central Turkey unearthed 51 Roman graves, within which were recovered nine rings of gold, silver, iron and bronze with carved intaglios.  One-third of the gemstones are octagonal, providing this rare type with a secure archaeological context.  A rising number of newly excavated and published examples from the past decade have raised the possibility that these octagonals are the product of an unknown central Anatolian workshop, one which catered to a mixed pagan and Christian clientele.

Contact:
Professor Andrew Goldman
goldman@gonzaga.edu
509-313-6691

"Global Climate Research and the Archaeological Record: A Review of the Last 10,000 Years in the Pacific Northwest and Central Asia"

Sponsored by Spokane Society

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, February 1, 2012 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W. 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99204
United States

Dr. Jerry Galm (Eastern Washington University)

Often overlooked in the continuing discussion of modern-era global climate change is the mounting evidence of climate change in worldwide historic and prehistoric archaeological records.  Data gleaned from such records has consistently identified change in many regional climatic records approaching and even exceeding current projections for the magnitude of climate change in the 21st Century.  This presentation will compare records of climate change over the last 10,000 years from the Pacific Northwest and Central Asia as a way of highlighting the kinds of data categories potentially present in archaeological records, the size and extent of selected intervals of climate change, and apparent human responses to large-scale changes in climate.

Website: http://www.gonzaga.edu/academics/colleges-and-schools/College-of-Arts-and-Scienc...

Contact:
Professor Andrew Goldman
goldman@gonzaga.edu
509-313-6691

Dishing out the Dirt: Student Experiences at Archaeological Field Schools

Sponsored by Spokane Society of the AIA

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Saturday, October 22, 2011 - 10:00am - 11:00am

Location:
Gonzaga University in the College Hall Building, Room 203
502 E. Boone Ave
Spokane, WA
United States

In celebration of National Archaeology Day, the Spokane Society of the AIA will host a presentation by local college students entitled "Dishing out the Dirt: Student Experiences at Archaeological Field Schools".  The hour-long group presentation will feature four undergraduates who will share the treasured moments, trials and tribulations -- the "dirt", as it were -- of their recent fieldwork experiences in Jordan and Bulgaria.  The event will take place on the campus of Gonzaga University in the College Hall Building (502 E. Boone Ave), in Rm. 203 at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011.  The gathering is free and open to the public.  For more information about the event, please contact Dr. Andrew Goldman, at: 509-313-6691 or goldman@gonzaga.edu.

Contact:
Dr. Andrew Goldman
goldman@gonzaga.edu
509-313-6691

Beneath the Sands of Egypt

Sponsored by Spokane Society

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, September 7, 2011 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Location:
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 W. 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201
United States

Archaeologist/Egyptologist Donald P. Ryan will describe his latest
discoveries from his ongoing excavations in
Egypt's famed royal cemetery, the Valley of the Kings.  Ryan is a Faculty
Fellow in Humanities at Pacific Lutheran
University, Tacoma, Washington.

Contact:
Andrew Goldman
goldman@gonzaga.edu
509-313-6691

Go Spartans: Girls' Athletics in Ancient Greece

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Spokane

Wednesday, October 5, 2011 - 6:30pm

Location:
Museum of Arts and Culture
2316 West 1st Avenue
Spokane, WA 99201
United States

Lecturer: Jenifer Neils

Abstract: Go Spartans: Girls’ Athletics in Ancient Greece

Joukowsky Lecture

Contact:
AIA

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