Archaeology Family Day: Moccasins and More

Sponsored by University of Colorado Museum of Natural History

AIA Society Event: Boulder

Saturday, October 18, 2014 - 10:00am - 4:00pm

Location:
University of Colorado Museum of Natural History
Broadway and 15th St on the CU-Boulder Campus
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

Celebrate National Archaeology Day with us as we discover the past under – and on – your feet.  Explore some of the techniques archaeologists use as they dig back through time to learn about sandals, moccasins, mukluks and more. Archaeologists can even trace the evolution of footwear through changes in the bone structure of our feet! Try your hand at making cordage from plant fibers, create your own design with beads and porcupine quills, dig for clues through layers of time.

Website: http://cumuseum.colorado.edu

Contact:
Museumed
museumed@colorado.edu
303-492-1666

CSPM Archaeology Day

Sponsored by Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum

AIA Society Event: Colorado

Saturday, October 18, 2014 - 10:00am - 2:00pm

Location:
Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum
215 S. Tejon Street
Colorado Springs, CO 80903
United States

CSPM Archaeology Day

October 18 is International Archaeology Day! Join the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum for a family fun day. Enjoy a variety of talks, discussions, interactive booths, workshops, and kid-friendly crafts and activities. Check the website for an updated schedule and list of events and participants.

Reservations Required – Call (719) 385-5990 or visit cspm.org

Free and open to the public

Website: http://www.cspm.org/ai1ec_event/cspm-archaeology-day/?instance_id=7295

Contact:
Megan Poole
mpoole@springsgov.com
7193855631

Creticum Vinum Excellens: The Role of Cretan Wine in the Roman Economy by Dr. S. Gallimore (Wilfrid Laurier University)

AIA Society Event: Boulder

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 - 7:00pm

Location:
CU Natural History Museum
1030 N Broadway St.
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

The island of Crete has never received sufficient attention in discussions of the Roman economy. Well positioned along East-West and North-South trade routes, Crete’s economy flourished throughout Roman history as a transshipment point for goods travelling across the Mediterranean and as an exporter in its own right.  The most visible export shipped from the island’s shores was wine packaged in ceramic amphorae.  These amphorae have been found in almost every province of the Roman world, indicating the large scale of this export trade. 

This lecture aims to examine three interconnected aspects of the trade in Cretan wine.  First, it assesses how and why the destination for the island’s exports changed over the course of Roman history.  In the first two centuries AD, the Tyrrhenian coast of Italy was the primary importer, followed by the southern Adriatic in the third and fourth centuries, and finally the region of the Black Sea in the Late Roman period.  Second, the paper assesses how the trade in Cretan wine can be used as a proxy for understanding broader economic patterns across the Mediterranean.  Finally, it asks the question ‘Why Cretan wine?’  What was the appeal of this product that led to it dominating the import market of so many centers throughout the Roman period?

Contact:
Sarah James
sarah.a.james@colorado.edu

Flutes, Wine, and Astronomy: Shamans in Early East Asia by Dr. S. Nelson (University of Denver)

AIA Society Event: Boulder

Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - 7:00pm

Location:
CU Natural History Museum
1030 N Broadway St.
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

Chinese archaeologists have identified a number of archaeological manifestations that they attribute to shamanism.  These include music (drums, flutes, and bells), alcoholic beverages, and evidence of worship of the sky.  This talk examines the Chinese evidence, and then considers it in the broader perspectives of shamanism in East Asia from the Neolithic to the present. 

Contact:
Sarah James
sarah.a.james@colorado.edu

Citizen-soldiers in Ancient Greek and Rome by Dr. N. Rockwell (University of Denver)

AIA Society Event: Boulder

Wednesday, December 3, 2014 - 7:00pm

Location:
CU Natural History Museum
1030 N Broadway St.
Boulder 80309
United States

Contact:
Sarah James
sarah.a.james@colorado.edu

Architecture and Assemblage at the Site of Polis-Chrysochous on Cyprus by Dr. W. Caraher (University of North Dakota)

AIA Society Event: Boulder

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 7:00pm

Location:
CU Natural History Museum
1030 N Broadway St.
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

The last three decades has been a golden age in the archaeology of Late Antique Cyprus.  Recent work on the island has drawn from pioneering intensive surveys to meticulous excavations of rural sites that often fell outside the traditional scope of Mediterranean archaeological research. The theoretical innovation and methodologically significant fieldwork on Cyprus, however, has done little to project the island from the fringes of most archaeological conversations.  Falling at the fringes of the Levant and the Greek world, synthetic studies of Late Antiquity have overlooked archaeological evidence from the island that might contributed to the increasingly complicated views of regional exchange, Late Roman identity, and architectural practice.  Read more »

Contact:
Sarah James
sarah.a.james@colorado.edu

Early Monumental Architecture in the Turkana Basin, Kenya: Ancient landscape reconstruction, ground-penetrating radar mapping and the excavation of 4 stone pillar sites around ancient Lake Turkana by Dr. L. Conyers (University of Denver)

AIA Society Event: Boulder

Wednesday, September 17, 2014 - 7:00pm

Location:
CU Natural History Museum
1030 N Broadway St.
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

The discovery and analysis of four standing-stone sites dating to about 5,000 years ago along what was the margin of ancient Lake Turkana provides a new model for how and why people constructed complex sites of this sort.  In this area the evidence shows that these were built about 1,000 years before any evidence of agriculture, and at the very beginnings of animal domestication.  Excavations this summer show that many hundreds of people were buried communally near and within these stone monuments, some associated with beautiful beads, ivory rings and other high status items.  Ground-penetrating radar analysis of the area near the standing stones shows a progression of burials over perhaps 500 years of time where the burial area was expanded, remodeled and changed.   These discoveries seem to suggest that our standard anthropological models for why people build monuments of this sort need to be refined or modified. 

Contact:
Sarah James
sarah.a.james@colorado.edu

Family Day

Sponsored by University of Colorado Museum of Natural History

AIA Society Event: Boulder

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Location:
CU Natural History Museum
1030 N Broadway St.
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

Website: http://cumuseum.colorado.edu/

Contact:
Cathy Regan
cathy.regan@colorado.edu
(303) 492-6892

Trade and Civilization in Medieval East Africa

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, October 26, 2014 - 2:00pm

Location:
TBA
Denver, CO
United States

Lecturer: Chapurukha Kusimba

Abstract: Trade and Civilization in Medieval East Africa

Contact:
AIA Lecture Program
lectures@aia.bu.edu

Understanding Bodiam Castle

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Boulder

Monday, March 9, 2015 - 7:00pm

Location:
Old Main Building, Colorado University Campus
Boulder, CO
United States

Lecturer: Matthew Johnson

Abstract: Understanding Bodiam Castle

Contact:
AIA Lecture Program
lectures@aia.bu.edu

Syndicate content

Become a Member

Become a Member

Become a Member to enjoy exclusive benefits and discounts while supporting the Institute’s outreach, education, and preservation initiatives. Join today!

Subscribing Members

Upgrade today

ARCHAEOLOGY readers are Subscribing Members of the AIA. Upgrade today and continue to receive the magazine while enjoying all the great benefits of supporting the AIA at a higher level.

Dig Deeper

Email the AIA
Subscribe to the AIA e-Update

Sign Up!