The Gold Crowns of Silla (Korea) and the Tomb of a Queen

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America, Denver Chapter

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, May 4, 2014 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm

Location:
University of Denver, Sturm Hall Room 453
2000 E. Asbury Avenue
Denver, CO 80208
United States

The largest mounded tomb from the Silla kingdom in Korea was found to be that of a queen, who wore a pure gold crown and a golden belt of leadership. These make it clear that she was a ruling queen, but she does not appear in the official list of kings, although some queens do. How can archaeology solve this mystery, without any writing in the tomb?

Website: http://www.aiadenver.org

Contact:
Aaron Theis
aiadenver@gmail.com
303-648-1968

The Ancient Synagogue and Village at Huqoq, Israel

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, March 30, 2014 - 2:00pm

Location:
University of Denver
Denver, CO
United States

Lecturer: Jodi Magness

Abstract: The Ancient Synagogue and Village at Huqoq, Israel

Joukowsky Lecture

Contact:
M Dores Cruz
mdores.cruz@gmail.edu
303-862-7062

The Magic of Art and Writing in Ancient Egypt

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, October 27, 2013 - 2:00pm

Location:
University of Denver
Denver, CO 80202
United States

Lecturer: Lanny Bell

Abstract: The Magic of Art and Writing in Ancient Egypt

Kershaw Lecture

Contact:
M. Dores Cruz
mdores.cruz@gmail.com
303-862-7062

National Archaeology Day

Sponsored by University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Archaeological Institute of America, Boulder Chapter, Archaeological Institute of America, Denver Chapter, University of Colorado Anthropology, University of Colorado Classics, Denver Museum of Nature and Science, History Colorado, Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation

AIA Society Event: Denver

Saturday, October 20, 2012 - 10:00am - 4:00pm

Location:
University of Colorado Museum of Natural History
1030 Broadway
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

Archaeology is everywhere you turn as the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, the Archaeological Institute of America, Boulder Chapter and Archaeological Institute of America, Denver Chapter the University of Colorado Anthropology and  University of Colorado Classics departments join together to celebrate National Archaeology Day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20.

The day includes family activities as well as research, lectures, and gallery tours for adult audiences. A historical Roman enactor, from the Denver Museum of Nature and Science’s “Day in Pompeii” exhibition, will make a special appearance. The enactor will wander the museum and interact with visitors as if in Pompeii.

The day’s schedule includes: Read more »

Website: http://www.aiadenver.org

Contact:
Aaron Theis
aiadenver@gmail.com
303-866-2575

Ann Axtell Morris: Art in Archaeology of the Southwest and Mesoamerica

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America, Denver Chapter and Tattered Cover Bookstore

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, April 28, 2013 - 2:00pm

Location:
Tattered Cover Bookstore
1668 16th Street
Denver, CO 80202
United States

Ann Axtell Morris, archaeologist, artist, and author, was the wife of prominent archaeologist, Earl H. Morris, and mother of Colorado State University Professor and archaeologist, Elizabeth A. Morris. Ann accompanied Earl on major, multi-year expeditions sponsored by the Carnegie Institution during the 1920s and 1930s in the U. S. Southwest and Mexico. During those years, she recorded architecture, rock art, murals, landscapes, and expedition work in watercolor paintings and drawings and pioneered methods of documentation that remain in use today. She painted studies of historic Navajo and sought ethnographic information. Her works provide context for important sites including those of Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Chichen Itzá, Yucatan, and Mesa Verde National Park. The watercolors offer information about ancient use of color in a time of black and white photography. In 1933, Ann wrote two books, Digging in Yucatan and Digging in the Southwest, that have inspired generations to know and be interested in the methods and goals of archaeology, pursue it as a career, and value the challenges in remote places.   Read more »

Website: http://www.aiadenver.org

Contact:
Aaron Theis
aiadenver@gmail.com
303-866-2575

Dr. Nicholas Rockwell, University of Denver: Uncovering the Lower Classes in Ancient Greek Warfare and Politics

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America, Denver Chapter and Tattered Cover Bookstore

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, March 24, 2013 - 2:00pm

Location:
Tattered Cover Bookstore
1668 16th Street
Denver, CO 80202
United States

The traditional focus in ancient Greek warfare has been on the heavily-armed infantryman called the hoplite. For roughly three hundred years (c. 650-350 BC), Greek hoplites, arrayed in the compact mass formation known as the phalanx, dominated the way states waged war. However, over time light-armed soldiers such as slingers, archers, javelin-men, and small-shield bearing soldiers called peltasts increasingly made significant contributions to military engagements. In fact, it was the effective use of light-armed soldiers during the late fifth and early fourth centuries BC that brought about fundamental changes in hoplite warfare. States could no longer rely just on the cumbersome and vulnerable hoplite phalanx to achieve victory in the field: they had to incorporate various auxiliary troops into their armies to keep up with the changing nature of war.

Connected to these military developments were transformations in the political sphere. As light-armed soldiers, who generally came from the lower classes, came to play a more significant role in war there was a tendency for states to become more democratic, often abolishing property qualifications for political participation and relying on a primary assembly for all major state decisions. This lecture will examine these military and political developments and their broader implications for ancient Greek society. Read more »

Website: http://www.aiadenver.org

Contact:
Aaron Theis
aiadenver@gmail.com
303-866-2575

Dr. Payson Sheets, University of Colorado, Boulder: What Was That Horrible Thing That Happened Around The World In AD 536?

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America, Denver Chapter and Tattered Cover Bookstore

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 2:00pm

Location:
Tattered Cover Bookstore
1668 16th Street
Denver, CO 80202
United States

The few literate cultures in AD 536 recorded intense cold, crop failures, starvation, and deaths. About 75% of the people in a northern Chinese kingdom died. Similar problems were reported around the Mediterranean. Tree rings in North America, Europe, and Asia record 15 years of cold beginning in AD 536. Ice cores in Greenland and in Antarctica record a dramatic increase in sulfur in the same year, indicating a volcanic eruption was the cause, and not an asteroid impact. The worldwide sulfur circulation indicates an eruption in atropical latitude, and the greater sulfur in Greenland indicates an eruption north of the equator.

Since 1969 I have been investigating the eruption of Ilopango volcano in El Salvador, at 14°north latitude. I have struggled with radiocarbon dating, but recent improvements and work with colleagues have indicated the eruption must have occurred more recently than the 5th century. It appears the Ilopango Eruption is the most likely candidate for the worst worldwide disaster in the past few millennia. Read more »

Website: http://www.aiadenver.org

Contact:
Aaron Theis
aiadenver@gmail.com
303-866-2575

Dr. Larry Conyers, University of Denver: Mapping the Ice Age Landscape of Coastal Portugal with Ground-Penetrating Radar: Using Geology, Geophysics, and Archaeology to Place Ice Age Hunters in their Environment

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America, Denver Chapter and Tattered Cover Bookstore

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, October 28, 2012 - 2:00pm

Location:
Tattered Cover Bookstore
1668 16th Street
Denver, CO 80202
United States

Reindeer and auroch hunting groups in the Upper Paleolithic of Europe were big-game hunters who survived in a landscape that is very different from today. In coastal Portugal ground-penetrating radar and geological mapping has placed a number of sites ranging in age from 30,000 to 25,000 years ago in an environment that was dry, cold and populated by herds of large herbivores. Hunting strategies and subsistence methods can be inferred by placing information from standard archaeological methods into this complex ancient world.

Dr. Larry Conyers is Professor of Anthropology and Director of Graduate and Undergraduate programs with the University of Denver. Dr. Conyers received his BS in Geology in 1973 From Oregon State University, his MS in Geology from Arizona State University in 1975, and his MA (1993) and PhD (1995) from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Conyers area of specialization is ground penetrating-radar in archaeology. Other interests include archaeometry, geological methods, Latin America, The Great Plains, and the United States Southwest. Dr. Conyers conducted fieldwork in locations that include El Salvador, Peru, Guatemala, and Jordan. 

Website: http://www.aiadenver.org

Contact:
Aaron Theis
aiadenver@gmail.org
303-866-2575

Ancient Sounds of Greece

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, November 4, 2012 - 2:00pm

Location:
Tattered Cover Book Store
16th & Wynkoop
Denver, CO
United States

Lecturer: Nikos Xanthoulis

Abstract: Ancient Sounds of Greece

Kress Lecture

Contact:
James Jansson
james.jansson@rbc.com
303-841-5707

Of Pots and People: Updates from the Field, Tell Timai, Egypt

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Denver

Sunday, February 17, 2013 - 2:00pm

Location:
Tattered Cover Book Store
16th & Wynkoop
Denver, CO
United States

Lecturer: Nicholas Hudson

Abstract: Of pots and people: updates from the field, Tell Timai, Egypt

Contact:
James Jansson
james.jansson@rbc.com
303-841-5707

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