Roman Green: Ancient Roman Gardens and the Green Ideal

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Saturday, March 1, 2014 - 11:00am

Location:
Pillsbury Auditorium, Minneapolis Museum of Arts
2400 3rd Ave S
Minneapolis, MN 55404
United States

Lecturer: Annette Giesecke

Abstract: Roman Green: Ancient Roman Gardens and the Green Ideal

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vrousseau@stthomas.edu

Tina Neuhauser, “Roman Provincial Theaters – A Review Based on Selected Examples”

Sponsored by AIA-MN and Macalester College

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Thursday, November 8, 2012 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm

Location:
John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College
1600 Grand Ave
St Paul, MN 55105
United States

The Roman architect Vitruvius (De architectura
5,3,1) said that building a theater was one of the first
priorities at a site: “When the forum is placed, a spot
as healthy as possible is to be chosen for the theatre,
for the exhibition of games on the festival days of the
immortal gods…”
Evidence of ancient theaters can be found
throughout the whole Roman Empire.  In addition to
extant theaters, one finds their indications in present
architectural remains or in eference to performances
found on inscriptions.
Not enough attention has been given to the
Provinces concerning the existence of theaters and to
their role in the history of ancient theater. This is
particularly true in Dalmatia, Moesia, Noricum and
Pannonia, where a number of diverging cultures met.
Greek, Roman/Italic as well as Gallic influences can
be seen in theaters in these provinces based on
selected examples. Moreover, these four Roman
Provinces provide us with an interesting legacy,
which cannot be found in the rest of the Roman
Empire.
 

Website: http://aiamn.blogspot.com/

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vousseau@stthomas.edu

Students in Archaeology: Poster Presentation of Recent Fieldwork

Sponsored by AIA, MN Society

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Saturday, October 20, 2012 - 11:00am - 1:00pm

Location:
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Ave
St Paul , MN 55105
United States

Undergraduate and graduate students at MN institutions who participated in an archaeological project during the past two years are invited to present a poster about their field experience. We are reaching out to our community by presenting the vibrant student involvement with archaeological fieldwork and projects nationally and internationally. We hope to inspire students and the general public and encourage life-long interest in preservation of archaeological heritage. The poster session should also bring together students and professionals from different institutions, and encourage membership in the AIA and its MN Society. We expect that students presenting posters of their work will introduce their classmates, families and friends to the AIA and to its global work.

Website: http://aiamn.blogspot.com/

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vousseau@stthomas.edu

Secret of the Great Pyramid

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Saturday, September 29, 2012 - 11:00am

Location:
Pillsbury Auditorium, Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Minneapolis, MN
United States

Lecturer: Bob Brier

Abstract: Secret of the Great Pyramid

Norton Lecture

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vrousseau@stthomas.edu

Bar Codes (but no scanner!): Potmarks and what they tell us about Late Bronze Age Business

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Saturday, February 9, 2013 - 11:00am

Location:
Pillsbury Auditorium, Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Minneapolis, MN
United States

Lecturer: Nicolle Hirschfeld

Abstract: Bar codes (but no scanner!): Potmarks and what they tell us about Late Bronze Age business

Kershaw Lecture

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vrousseau@stthomas.edu

Where Cutting Edge Meets Cultural Heritage: Investigating Deeply Submerged Archaeological Sites

Sponsored by Archaeological Institute of America

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Saturday, April 20, 2013 - 11:00am

Location:
Pillsbury Auditorium, Minneapolis Institute of Arts
Minneapolis, MN
United States

Lecturer: Alexis Catsambis

Abstract: Where Cutting Edge Meets Cultural Heritage: Investigating Deeply Submerged Archaeological Sites

Bass Lecture

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vrousseau@stthomas.edu

The Intrusive Gift: the Marble Guardsmen in the Tomb of a Tang-dynasty Court Eunuch

Sponsored by AIA-MN

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Saturday, April 28, 2012 - 11:00am

Location:
The John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College
United States

Lecture by Amy McNair

Website: http://aiamn.blogspot.com/

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vrousseau@stthomas.edu

TBA

Sponsored by AIA-MN

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Thursday, March 1, 2012 - 6:00pm

Location:
in the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College
United States

Lecture by Caroline Sauvage, title TBA 

Website: http://aiamn.blogspot.com/

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vrousseau@stthomas.edu

The Nabataean Achievement at Petra

Sponsored by AIA-MN

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Thursday, February 2, 2012 - 6:00pm

Location:
the John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College
United States

Lecture by Jeff Pearson

Website: http://aiamn.blogspot.com/

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vrousseau@stthomas.edu

The Archaeology of the Origins of Modern Humans

Sponsored by AIA-MN

AIA Society Event: Minneapolis/St. Paul

Thursday, December 1, 2011 - 6:00pm

Location:
John B. Davis Lecture Hall in the Ruth Stricker Dayton Campus Center at Macalester College
United States

Lecture by Gilbert Tostevin

Why anatomically modern humans survived the Pleistocene Epoch, whereas our evolutionary relatives, the Neanderthals and other archaic Homo species did not, is a fundamental question for anthropological archaeology.  The origins of modern humans as a research subject engages of the fields of genetics, biological anthropology, demographic modeling, geology, and Paleolithic archaeology.  I will present the archaeological conclusions concerning both the consensus view of our species’ origins as well as recent cutting edge research on the adaptations that allowed our proliferation at the end of the last Ice Age.  Regardless of which of these adaptations (long-range weaponry, diet breadth, social behavior, and others) were most critical, each potential explanation has a significant message for our species’ immediate present and future.

Website: http://aiamn.blogspot.com/

Contact:
Vanessa Rousseau
vrousseau@stthomas.edu

Syndicate content

Become a Member

Become a Member

Become a Member to enjoy exclusive benefits and discounts while supporting the Institute’s outreach, education, and preservation initiatives. Join today!

Subscribing Members

Upgrade today

ARCHAEOLOGY readers are Subscribing Members of the AIA. Upgrade today and continue to receive the magazine while enjoying all the great benefits of supporting the AIA at a higher level.

Dig Deeper

Email the AIA
Subscribe to the AIA e-Update

Sign Up!